Seeking Something Old in Something New

When one has lost a cherished relationship they tend to seek a new one. But the new must have elements of the old. All Intimate relations involve satisfaction of needs for the warmth and comfort experienced in childhood. That is, satisfaction of basic, old needs are are a key aspect of all close relations. While the person who can satisfy those needs may be a new person, they still have to met the old, unchanging needs. All of our intimate relations serve the same function regardless of who the other person is.

A barrier to forming new bonds after old ones are severed is feeling of regret and perhaps guilt about the ending of the old connection. This means we may find it hard to be open to a new relationship. So, our basic unchanging needs will go unsatisfied for a long time. Depression, loneliness and despair will occur. How can one overcome this? Somehow we have to honor our needs. Realise that they are universal requirements for life. Denial of our needs is a denial of life. Knowing this can put one in touch with life outside the 3-D. One needs to connect to the ‘spiritual’ side of things. This is a basic need too.

Sophistication

I wrote a book called ‘Sophistication’. It actually was the runner up in the New Mexico-Arizona Book Co-Op competition. It was imagined to be a ‘self-help’ book. It is perhaps of some help to people wanting to make good, sophisticated decisions in life. But the book is not a typical self-help book. It makes some fun of such books. For instance these books almost always have some list of rules you need to follow in order to achieve success, popularity, spirituality, and so on. I satirize this kind of thing in ‘Sophistication’. It is so facile. In any case, the book that won the self-help category was called “49 Rules for Overcoming Heroin Addiction”. Somehow the judges were unable to get the joke. The winner did exactly what I was lampooning in my book. In contrast I have a list of 6 clever rules to achieve sophistication:

  1. Never believe that anything is caused by merely one thing.
  2. Never say thank you after someone thanks you.
  3. Never try to be normal,
  4. Never try to be abnormal.
  5. Don’t do what doesn’t work.
  6. Do what you want to do.

Now, this list might give you a sense of what the book ‘Sophistication’ is like. When I tried to enter another book contest I was told my book fit into no known category of books and, hence, I was excluded from the contest. When I said, “Isn’t a unique, one of kind book a great thing?. I was told it would not be fair to the other contestants. This the world we live in now.

Buy the book. You’ll love it

https://www.amazon.com/Sophistication-W-M-Bernstein/dp/1519142129

http://williambernstein.com

Do You Consult Astrologers or Tarot Card Readers?

I wrote two days ago about two different ways people use to comfort themselves. One is getting comfort from themselves or other people. The other is asking god for help. The latter method involves appealing not to a human being but to a giant force that is thought to have created the entire world and should thereby be able to solve any problem. When a problem seems too great to overcome by oneself or other mortals, people often turn to the universe or god to help us. Awful problems for which we seem to need divine intervention include losing a spouse, losing children, terminal disease, and so on. These things no person can undo.

Besides god proper, there are other systems of belief that people seek out when help seems unavailable in the 3-D world. These include astrology, tarot cards, fortune tellers, and other so called ‘mystical’ or ‘occult’ methods. These sorts of comfort systems involve an appeal to the mysterious forces of the universe, as do appeals to god. Belief in the occultism is often called ‘spiritual’. Many people today say, “I am spiritual, not religious”. So there is an assumption that belief in god, which is central to all religions, is not the same as belief in, for example, astrology. But both sorts of things involve some belief in the power of invisible forces.

Tarot card readings can no doubt help one feel better when there are no obvious solutions to their problems. Most of the tarot and astrology experts on the internet make predictions and give advice that are comforting. Of course, this increases business. No one wants to hear from a psychic or anyone else that the future looks gloomy. Practitioners of spiritual practices explain this bias by imaging that ,in the end, spirits will make everything okay. This assumption is not too different from that made by religions. But religious faith usually includes the idea that if one’s behavior has been sinful, it may take some special effort to get god to help you out. You might go to hell perhaps. In some contrast, spiritualism has less rules. Everything will be okay eventually, regardless of how much of a miscreant one has been.

Some say, “Everything happens for a reason” Now that doesn’t seem especially profound. Of course everything happens for a reason if you believe in causality. What happens today is caused by something that happened previously. But religious and spiritual traditions suspend the usual rules of causality prefered by science. Scientists would think that if a giant rock rolls over you, it is likely you’ll never get up again. But religious or occultist might imagine that the rock fell on you due to your ‘karma’ or ‘god’s will’. These things plays out in the long run. Bad and good karma , and good and sinful behavior will influence what happens in the long run.But as the economist John Maynard Keynes said, “The long run is a misleading guide to current affairs. In the long run we are all dead.” And that kind of sums this all up. Death seems inevitable unless one imagines that one’s soul never dies. This is, more or less, what both religionist and spiritualists think. Isn’t it?